The YouTube Demographic for Watching Gross Videos

The “gross” majority of viewers are between the ages of 35 and 54 with the 45-54 group only barely being inched out by the younger crowd. That means that a majority of people watching Zeke, my siamese cat, popping a squat on my toilet, are middle-aged. That sort of amazes me. Sure, adults are just grown up kids, but I’m wondering if this distribution holds true for other videos on YouTube. Is YouTube’s core demographic the Gen Xers?

http://www.autodogmatic.c…ttoilettraining

Warning, the following video is gross.

[video:youtube:awYO4ArTsQg]

What feels like an eternity ago (2002) I tried to train my cat to use the toilet. It sorta worked: it’s a long story (See the Link above if you really want to know the details).

Today, the momento of that training lives on in the YouTube video I created back in 2006, embedded above. As of today, that video has been seen by over a million people. Weird.

What I didn’t realize until now was that YouTube has some fairly robust statistics regarding who views your videos. In tinkering around and looking at these stats, I stumbled on this report on the viewer demographics. Note which age-group has viewed the video the most:

The “gross” majority of viewers are between the ages of 35 and 54 with the 45-54 group only barely being inched out by the younger crowd. That means that a majority of people watching Zeke, my siamese cat, popping a squat on my toilet, are middle-aged. That sort of amazes me. Sure, adults are just grown up kids, but I’m wondering if this distribution holds true for other videos on YouTube. Is YouTube’s core demographic the Gen Xers?

It’d sort of make sense; of all the entertainment mediums available for consumption on the Internet, watching videos requires no real tech skills. Perhaps this is just tied to the general population distribution? Or is it that most of this age group is at a desk job pretending to work while actually watching cats poop on the Internet?

Anyone else have video data from YouTube that might shed light on this subject? Other insights?

Crisis of Credit Visualized

http://vimeo.com/3261363

Even as simplified as this great 10 minute video is, it still gets complicated. And as you can imagine, when you’ve got so many transactions handling a piece of mortgage paper, even the bankers have a hard time keeping track, which just complicates this process further — sending it to a grinding halt in some cases.

I.e. you’re foreclosing and the bank wants you out of the house. You demand to see the loan and the bank can’t find it. Until they can show it to you, they can’t kick you out. Yeah, really. So often people are staying in their houses mortgage-free for months before the bank can track down the loan and actually foreclose/kick them out.


The Crisis of Credit Visualized from Jonathan Jarvis on Vimeo.

Nassim Taleb and Nouriel Roubini on CNBC

http://www.cnbc.com/id/15840232?video=1027496846

Video from CNBC. Hard to glean anything particularly new from this. It is maddening to watch the CNBC pundits try and talk over Roubini and Taleb and then demand investment advice from them. What a bunch of whiny, idiotic children.